Below is a link for Services in ACT

http://www.communityservices.act.gov.au/wac/ageing
 


There has been a policy change re Replacement of Medals all the information and Application Form can be accessed at this link:http://www.defence.gov.au/Medals/Policy/Replacements.asp

 




Melbourne Military History Conference: Conscription and National Service
Saturday 30 May 2015, CHECK AGAINST DELIVERY  -  EMBARGO 0945 30 / 5 / 2015
 
Reflections on Conscription in Australia:
It should never be selective National Service ever again: Either all in or none in !
 
Tim Fischer AC , Author, Former Deputy PM, ex Ambassador and  Federal Nationals Leader. 
Fifty years ago National Service selective balloting commenced in Australia to pick out a cohort of young men turning twenty and send them into the Army for two years. One hundred years ago Conscription referenda were considered in Australia, fiercely debated and ultimately defeated at the height of World War One.
It is never an easy issue for vibrant democracies to handle, with the compulsion element clashing with the spirit of freedom dimensions of democracy, plus the always difficult to define and administer aspect of “Conscientious Objection” overarching all, in times of war.
In a democracy, it for the Executive to propose Conscription or National Service, the Parliament or Congress to consider and pass into law the requirements involved, sometimes involving the people by  way of referendum. It is then implemented with lashings of anti-democratic  compulsion – all in defence of the nation state same said democracy.
As you would expect, this is as never easy and a close reading of history affirms this in exactitude. It all goes back to the Commonwealth Defence  Act of 1903 that did provide for compulsory “Home Defence Service” but not overseas service. Later speakers will deal with this in more detail but let me quote from my book MAESTRO JOHN MONASH: Australia’s greatest Citizen General”:
(Remember it was then Prime Minister W M Hughes who drove forward the conscription issue and there is some evidence he became unhinged by the results)
Generals are not meant to buy into political fights but Birdwood (British Indian born AIF GOC, later made an Australian Field Marshal in 1925, ahead of Blamey and Prince Philip) was asked to make a statement in favour of a ‘Yes’ vote and for that to be widely distributed through the AIF.  Eventually the soldiers voted in October 1916 and back in Australia, the vote was held on the 28th October but the overall count mounted to a narrow loss for Hughes, 48% to 52%, a margin of 72,476 votes: Yes 1,087,557  No  1,160,033 and a repeat exercise in December 1917 saw the No vote margin more than double to 166,588 votes. The official results for the 20 December 1917 referendum was: 46% to 54 % so in total Yes 1,015,159  No  1,181,747.
 
In each referendum, it was single digit percentages deciding the NO results, it had been close but ultimately tested twice after detailed debate and the answer was NO. The Australian vibrant democracy of the era had rejected conscription in the darkest days of World War One,  to quote W M Hughes, egged on by that meddlesome  Irish prelate, Archbishop Daniel Mannix of Melbourne.
Joan Beaumont in her recent comprehensive book on the Great War, titled Broken Nation, highlights the Keith Murdoch observation that the Third Division in training on the Salisbury Plains had voted yes, counterbalancing the margin from the trenches. Maybe the Third Division soldiers voting were thinking about extra recruits to restore their manpower to full strength before they went to the Western Front. It was not to be but the understrength Division soon had its equipment and its embarkation orders.  (End of book extract)
Recently through the good book “Politics and Sacrifice” about the war service of NSW State Parliamentarians, I learnt of the extraordinary story of Ambrose Carmichael  MC  MLA, 1871 to 1953, who grew up on the Lachlan, elected for a Sydney seat (Leichhhardt) in 1907 as an ALP member, then he resigned as State Treasurer in 1915 to enter the Army as a private in the 36th Battalion. He personally rallied enlistments for the war, two lots of one thousand and he favoured conscription . In 1919 he resigned from the ALP over their opposition to conscription. In 1920 he failed to win back a seat in the NSW State Parliament.
It should be remembered every AIF member volunteered for World War One, including the 414 AIF Chaplains who I dedicated my Monash book to and the 61,000 who lost their lives - many towns and suburbs were decimated.  Despite the efforts of Ambrose Carmichael, it seems the majority of diggers did not want conscription and the nation was of two minds but ultimately voted narrowly against the compulsion involved.
National Service
Fifty years later selective National  Service was introduced in 1965 with some early push back. It was as Vietnam was unfolding with this difficult and controversial war leading to massive rallies, demonstrations and moratoriums. The Coalition Government was able to get the necessary approvals through the Parliament, the standout feature was a so called random ballot to select some but not all males as they turned twenty years of age.
At the time I thought the same number of balls or marbles marked with a particular date for the six monthly ballots were placed in the barrel for each day of the relevant six month period. I no longer think this is the case. It appears that after the Department of Labour and National Service and the Army reviewed the trades and experience and education of each registrant, some dates were then overloaded with marbles to ensure the right talent mix was called up.
On the 4th December 2014, I handed a clipping from the Canberra Times of 3 December 2014 direct to the Attorney General George Brandis in his office at Parliament House, in his capacity as head of the Office of National Archives. He assured me he would ascertain an answer to the simple question: Was the National Service ballot stacked in favour of certain pre- determined dates or not ? Well I have heard back from National Archives, see postscript.
 
Whatever the real story associated with National Service 1965 to 1972, it changed my life and it changed all the lives of those called up, some sadly making the ultimate sacrifice. In my case I had to mature quickly, after Kapooka and OTU  I was soon a Platoon Commander and Transport Officer with 1 RAR, dealing with a huge raft of man management problems and the requirements of raw leadership by a raw junior officer, on exercise then in Vietnam on operation but also in base camp.
It has to be said that maybe National Service will be required again, in this very  troubled world of the second decade of the Twenty First Century.
If so then the only fair way to proceed is surely to ensure all twenty year olds, both male and female, are called up for National Service. After the Navy, Army and RAAF have filled their needs then the remainder should be employed for Peace Corps type duties at home and abroad. This is expensive but it is the only true way to be fair and just. Of course usual and carefully defined “Conscientious Objection” provisions should be retained.
The Government of the day and the Parliament of the day will always be reluctant to go down this path because of the costs involved, also the career disruption to many with its own economic impact and also because in this century the real politik is that it would have to involve male and female  -with all the complications attaching.
However who can rule out for ever that it may in fact be necessary in the distant future. The war against terrorism generally has already extended beyond the combined length of World War One and Two, kicked along by that White House George Bush Junior and Downing Street Tony Blair led decision to invade Iraq in 2003. This indirectly resulted in the advent of the powerful  ISIS caliphate holding brutally much territory in both Iraq and Syria today.
To digress, if Lawrence of Arabia and also the phenomenal UK “Agent provocateur” Gertrude Bell had won the day at Versailles, back in 1919, with sensible boundaries and nation state creations for the Middle East sans France, then we would be better placed today. However the forces against ISIS and terrorism will win eventually – I am confident of this.
I reiterate though, you cannot rule out the need for National Service at some time in the future and when that times arrives,  all things considered, it would be best done on the basis of all in or none in, both male and female.
Australia is a vibrant democracy, warts and all and this Conference today is a reflection of this and a helpful platform to ensure we learn from our history and never ignore our history, to do so as others have stated would be to do so at our peril.
I close by commending to you that important statement that a Reservist or CMF Officer made in the Great Depression when declining to mount a “Coup d’etat”. I quote John Monash of Jerilderie and Melbourne: “The only hope for Australia is the ballot box and good education”.    ENDS
(Further Information NFP Tim Fischer 0427 271456)  POSTSCRIPT ATTACHED
 
 
 
POSTSCRIPT
It seems the National Service Ballot was not formally stacked but may have been stacked on the margins as - in short - not all were taken that had registered for a particular birth date drawn out in the twice yearly ballot.
I reiterate and emphasize not all registrants whose birth dates were drawn were called up in the twice yearly ballots (even allowing for health and other declared non call up or exempt categories), so it appears some person within the system played God big time.
Further, note 1  Jan to 30 Jun 1946 births, the month of May saw 13 days drawn out including mine but only 4 for albeit the short month of Feb, still this is almost beyond random possibilities. Now read on and all dates drawn are listed at the bottom for the actual ballots 1965 to 1972.
Australian War Memorial Facts Sheet re National service 1964 to 1972
Statistics
Between 1964 and 1972, 804 286 twenty-year-olds registered for national service and 63 735 national servicemen served in the Army.12.
Balloted out: 567, 238
Theological students, ministers of religion and members of religious orders: 553
Physical or mental disabilities: 1768
Conscientious objection determined by a court: 1242
Indefinite deferments: 35 548Married before the date of call-up: 20 502
Members of the Citizen Forces: 7197
Citizen Forces whose obligations completed: 7849
No longer liable to be called up: 102 134Death subsequent to registration: 916
Served or serving in Permanent Forces: 2194
Rejected as not meeting the medical, psychological and educational standards required by the Army: 99 010
Imprisoned for refusal to obey a call-up notice: 14
Unavailable for call-up as at 31 December 1972: 21 876Granted or being considered for deferment 15 526
Granted or seeking deferment on grounds of exceptional hardship: 470
Under investigation for suspected breaches of National Service Act: 3890
Granted permission to leave Australia: 610
Migrants not included elsewhere, not yet due for call-up: 1380
Called up and enlisted in the Army: 63 740
Available for call-up subject to meeting the standards required for Army service and the outcome of applications for exemption or deferment: 10 187Termination Act
During the 1972 election campaign the Australian Labor Party promised that 'all men imprisoned under the National Service Act will be released, pending prosecutions discontinued and existing convictions expunged'.
Within a few days of winning office in early December the new Minister for Labour and National Service, Lance Barnard, suspended the operation of the scheme by administrative action, cancelling the call-up of approximately 2200 men who had been medically examined and deferring the liability of all men who had enlisted for service. National servicemen already in the Army who did not wish to continue their service were released as quickly as possible. Prosecutions and pending prosecutions were dropped. Young men who had taken up the option of part-time military service in the Citizen Military Forces were able to be discharged at their own request. National servicemen who opted to complete their term of service were entitled to the same benefits as before. In June 1973 the Whitlam Government passed the National Service Termination Act, giving legislative effect to Barnard's administrative action. The Government also intended to repeal the National Service Act itself as soon as possible, but felt constrained to wait until national servicemen who continued to serve under the Act had completed their service and received all the benefits to which they were entitled under the Act. This state of affairs did not come about before the dismissal of the Whitlam Government on 11 November 1975.
The National Service Act 1951 and its subsequent amendments were repealed by the Defence Legislation Amendment Act of 1992. Following this legislation, the Government retained the power to introduce conscription under the Defence Act, but only in a time of war and only with prior parliamentary approval. The Act also revised provisions concerning conscientious objection, providing for special tribunals to determine claims and making it possible for an individual to be recognised as a conscientious objector to a particular war. In introducing the legislation the Parliamentary Secretary to the Attorney-General, Peter Duncan, said that the Keating Government's aim was 'to preserve the capacity to introduce conscription for the protection of Australia, but to ensure that those claiming exemption would receive a rapid and fair hearing'. The Government clearly wished to remove many of the anomalies in the operation of compulsory military service that had become evident during the Vietnam War. Duncan expressed the hope that repeal of the National Service Act would 'remove this last vestige of an unhappy and divisive episode in our history'.'3


Birthdates drawn in National Service ballots 1965-72
Birthdates drawn in the first National Service ballot: 10 March 1965
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1945 to 30 June 1945.
January 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 21, 23, 27, 28
February 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9,12, 14, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26
March 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 17, 18, 20, 24, 26, 27, 28, 29,30
April 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 29
May 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 9, 12, 14, 19, 22, 23, 26, 30
June 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, 17, 20, 21, 25, 26, 29
 
Birthdates drawn in the second National Service ballot: 10 September 1965
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1945 to 31 December 1945.
July 3, 6, 7, 8, 16, 22, 25, 26, 31
August 3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26
September 2, 4, 5, 6, 14, 17, 21, 25, 26
October 2, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 13, 16, 17, 23, 25, 29
November 3, 4, 12, 14, 15, 16, 22, 24, 27
December 6, 10, 12, 14, 17, 18, 19, 21, 24, 25, 26, 28, 31
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1945 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 3, 6, 7, 8, 16, 22, 25, 26, 31
February 3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26
March 5, 7, 8, 9, 17, 20, 24, 28, 29
April 4, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 25, 27
May 1, 6, 7, 15, 17, 18, 19, 25, 27, 30
June 8, 12, 14, 16, 19, 20, 21, 23, 26, 27, 28, 30
 
Birthdates drawn in the third National Service ballot: 1I March 1966
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1946 to 30 June 1946.
January 2, 3, 5, 12, 13, 21, 22, 30
February 1, 2, 12, 23
March 1, 21, 22, 24, 25, 28, 29
April 5, 10, 15, 18, 19, 24, 26, 29
May 2, 3, 4, 10, 11, 13, 14, 20, 22, 23, 26, 29, 30
June 1, 6, 9, 14, 17, 25, 30
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 January 1946 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
January to June—as above
July 2, 3, 5, 12, 13, 21, 22, 30
August 1, 2, 12, 23, 29
September 18, 19, 21, 22, 25, 26
October 3, 8, 13, 16, 17, 22, 24, 27, 30, 31
November 1, 7, 8, 10, 11, 17, 19, 20, 23, 26, 27, 29
December 4, 7, 12, 15, 23, 28, 31 
Birthdates drawn in the fourth National Service ballot: 9 September 1966
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1946 to 31 December 1946.
July 15, 17, 20, 24
August 2, 14, 19, 20, 22, 25, 27
September 12, 16, 18, 23, 24, 25
October 1, 16, 21, 22, 23, 29
November 1, 2, 5, 9, 11, 12, 17, 24, 26, 28, 30
December 1, 6, 18, 25
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1946 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 15, 17, 20, 24
February 2, 14, 19, 20, 22, 25, 27
March 15, 19, 21, 26, 27, 28
April 3, 18, 23, 24, 25
May 1, 4, 5, 8, 12, 14, 15, 20, 27, 29, 31
June 2, 3, 8, 20, 27
 
Birthdates drawn in the fifth National Service ballot: 10 March 1967
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1947 to 30 June 1947.
January 1, 4, 6, 7, 12, 16, 17, 20, 24, 25, 30
February 3, 8, 12, 16, 18, 23
March 3, 11, 16, 21, 22, 23
April 4, 12, 14, 15, 17, 19, 24, 29
May 1, 13, 14, 22, 25, 29
June 5, 11, 12, 15, 16, 20, 29
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 January 1947 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
January to June as above
July 1, 4, 6, 7, 12, 16, 17, 20, 24, 25, 30
August 3, 8, 12, 16, 18, 23, 31
September 8, 13,18,19, 20
October 2, 10, 12, 13, 15, 17, 22, 27, 29
November 10, 11, 19, 22, 26
December 3, 9, 10, 13, 14, 18, 27, 30
 
Birthdates drawn in the sixth National Service ballot: 8 September 1967
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1947 to 31 December 1947.
July 2, 12, 15, 19, 21, 23, 25, 29
August 1, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 19, 26, 27
September 10, 13, 15, 16, 19, 23
October 13, 14, 16, 21, 25, 26, 31
November 6, 17, 18
December 4, 10, 15, 22, 24, 25
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1947 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 2, 12, 15, 19, 21, 23, 25, 29
February 1, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12, 19, 26, 27
March 13, 16, 18, 19, 22, 26
April 15, 16, 18, 23, 27, 28
May 3, 9, 20, 21
June 6, 12, 17, 24, 26, 27
 
Birthdates drawn in the seventh National Service ballot: 15 March 1968
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1948 to 30 June 1948.
January 1, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21
February 5, 10, 11, 12, 14, 17, 21
March 2, 7, 8, 9, 15, 22, 25, 26, 29, 31
April 3, 16, 17, 19, 25, 30
May 1, 7, 11, 17, 18, 21, 23, 31
June 10, 17, 24, 28
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 January 1948 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
January to June—as above
July 1, 3, 5, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21
August 5, 10, 11, 12, 14, 17, 21, 30
September 4, 5, 6, 12, 19, 22, 23, 26, 28
October 1,14,15,17, 23, 28, 29
November 4, 8, 14, 15, 18, 20, 28
December 8, 15, 22, 26
 
Birthdates drawn in the eighth National Service ballot: 13 September 1968
 Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1948 to 31 December 1948.
July 3, 21, 22, 24, 30
August 1, 3, 16, 18, 24, 26
September 5, 9, 12, 14, 22, 23, 24, 26
October 3, 13, 18
November 5, 18, 24, 28, 29
December 7, 12, 14, 15, 19, 21, 22, 26
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1948 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 3, 21, 22, 24, 30
February 1, 3, 16, 18, 24, 26
March 7, 11, 14, 16, 24, 25, 26, 28
April 4, 14, 19
May 7, 20, 26, 30, 31
June 8, 13, 15, 16, 20, 22, 23, 27
 
Birthdates drawn in the ninth National Service ballot: 14 March 1969
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1949 to 30 June 1949.
January 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 14, 19, 20, 23, 25, 29, 31
February 3, 8, 12, 14, 20, 21, 22, 23, 28
March 1, 7, 11, 12, 20, 22, 26, 28
April 2, 3, 8, 11, 12, 13, 17, 18, 19, 21, 25, 26
May 13, 18, 19, 27
June 7, 9, 10, 23, 28, 30
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 January 1949 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
January to June—as above
July 2, 3, 9, 11, 12, 14, 19, 20, 23, 25, 29, 31
August 3, 8, 12, 14, 20, 21, 22, 23, 28, 30
September 5, 9, 10, 18, 20, 24, 26
October 1, 2, 7, 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 20, 24, 25
November 11, 16, 17, 25
December 6, 8, 9, 22, 27, 29, 31
 
Birthdates drawn in the tenth National Service ballot: 22 September 1969
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1949 to 31 December 1949.
July 3, 8, 11, 15, 20, 25
August 9, 13, 25, 29
September 18, 19, 21, 28
October 3, 5, 10, 11, 12, 15, 25
November 17, 22, 29
December 2, 5, 7, 15, 17, 25
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1949 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 3, 8, 11, 15, 20, 25
February 9, 13, 25, 29
March 20, 21, 23, 30
April 4, 6, 11, 12, 13, 16, 26
May 19, 24, 31
June 3, 6, 8, 16, 18, 26
 
Birthdates drawn in the eleventh National Service ballot: 13 March 1970
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1950 to 30 June 1950.
January 3, 4, 6, 11, 22, 26, 28, 30
February 4, 11, 15, 21
March 1, 10, 15, 21
April 7, 13, 15, 21, 28
May 10, 20, 22, 25, 31
June 4, 11, 19, 23
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 January 1950 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
January to June—as above
July 3, 4, 6, 11, 22, 26, 28, 30
August 4, 11, 15, 21, 30
September 8, 13, 19
October 6, 12, 14, 20, 27
November 8, 18, 20, 23, 29
December 3,10,18, 22
 
Birthdates drawn in the twelfth National Service ballot: 28 September 1970
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1950 to 31 December 1950.
July 5, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 29, 30
August 1, 17, 20, 21, 22, 28, 29, 31
September 2, 3, 5, 13, 15, 19, 26
October 2, 3, 4, 10, 15, 30
November 18, 20, 29, 30
December 2, 6, 7, 22, 28, 29
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1950 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 5, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 29, 30
February 1, 17, 20, 21, 22, 28, 29
March 2, 4, 5, 7, 15, 17, 21, 28
April 3, 4, 5, 11, 16
May 1, 20, 22, 31
June 1, 3, 7, 8, 23, 29, 30
 
Birthdates drawn in the thirteenth National Service ballot: 26 March 1971
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1951 to30 June 1951.
January 2, 7, 8, 11, 15, 26, 28
February 9, 10, 11, 13, 16, 18, 24, 28, 29
March 5, 7, 13, 15, 17, 20, 26, 27, 28, 30
April 2, 5, 6, 11, 12, 18, 19, 20, 21, 30
May 4, 5, 10, 13, 15, 16, 17, 25, 26, 29
June 2, 6, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 18, 21, 23, 28, 29, 30
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 January 1951 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
January to June—as above
July 2, 7, 8, 11, 15, 26, 28
August 9, 10, 11, 13, 16, 18, 24, 28, 29
September 3, 5, 11, 13, 15, 18, 24, 25, 26, 28
October 1, 4, 5, 10, 11, 17, 18, 19, 20, 29
November 2, 3, 8, 11, 13, 14, 15, 23, 24, 27
December 1, 5, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 20, 22, 27, 28, 29
 
Birthdates drawn in the fourteenth National Service ballot: 17 September 1971
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1951 to 31 December 1951.
July 1, 9, 10, 12, 13, 17, 21, 22, 26, 31
August 1, 6, 7, 10, 21, 24, 27, 30
September 4, 8, 10, 14, 21, 23, 28, 29
October 4, 5, 7, 10, 12, 16, 20, 22, 25
November 6, 8, 10, 12, 13, 22, 27, 28, 30
December 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, 28, 29, 31
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1951 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 1, 9, 10, 12, 13, 17, 21, 22, 26, 31
February 1, 6, 7, 10, 21, 24, 27
March 1, 6, 10, 12, 16, 23, 25, 30, 31
April 5, 6, 8, 11, 13, 17, 21, 23, 26
May 8, 10, 12, 14, 15, 24, 29, 30
June 1, 8, 9, 10, 17, 22, 29, 30
 
Birthdates drawn in the fifteenth National Service ballot: 24 March 1972
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 January 1952 to 30 June 1952.
January 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17, 23, 30
Februar 2, 3, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 29
March 9, 12, 13, 17, 26, 27, 30, 31
April 4, 5, 8, 11, 12, 22, 24, 29
May 2, 3, 5, 11, 13, 20
June 6, 7, 8, 10, 14, 16, 21, 24, 29, 30
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 January 1952 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
January to June—as above
July 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 17, 23, 30
August 2, 3, 12, 13, 15, 18, 19, 22, 23, 24, 29
September 7, 10, 11, 15, 24, 25, 28, 29
October 3, 4, 7, 10, 11, 21, 23, 28, 31
November 1, 3, 9, 11, 18
December 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 15, 20, 23, 28, 29
 
Birthdates drawn in the sixteenth National Service ballot: 22 September 1972
Men included in the ballot who were born in the period 1 July 1952 to 31 December 1952.
July 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 15, 17, 29, 30
August 1, 4, 11, 17, 19, 21, 28, 29
September 3, 10, 12, 17, 18, 20, 25
October 6, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 19, 29, 30
November 3, 15, 29, 30
December 1, 6, 21, 26, 30
Men included in the ballot who were born prior to 1 July 1952 but were absent from Australia when their age group was required to register.
July to December—as above
January 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 15, 17, 29, 30
February 1, 4, 11, 17, 19, 21, 28, 29
March 5, 12, 14, 19, 20, 22, 27
April 7, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 20, 30
May 1, 5, 17, 31
June 1, 2, 7, 22, 27





The Anzac Centenary Programme
The Anzac Centenary Programme commenced on 4 August with the 100th anniversary of the First World War.
The National Programme for the Anzac Centenary has three themes – education and research, commemorations, and arts and culture.
Anzac Centenary projects are progressing in a timely manner.  The National Anzac Centre on Mt Adelaide, Albany was completed on schedule and was dedicated by both the Australian and New Zealand Prime Ministers and the Premier of WA on 1 November 2014, during the ACCE weekend of 31 October - 2 November 2014.  The whole ACCE program was very successful and a fitting curtain raiser to the Anzac Centenary period. 
Education and Research
Online Education and Community Awareness – Anzac Portal
·         The Online Education and Community Awareness Portal  - the Anzac Portal - is an Anzac Centenary initiative which was launched by the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs at Parliament House in December 2014.
·         The Anzac portal is a new responsive website, accessible on smart phones, tablets, laptops and desktop computer systems.
·         The portal provides the education, veteran and wider communities with a range of information, resources, and links to relevant websites for the Anzac Centenary.
·         The portal has three major content areas: -
Education – to support the teaching of Australia’s wartime history;
History – to support community understanding of Australia’s wartime experiences; and
Events – to promote awareness of commemorative programs and allow communities to conduct their own commemorative events and ceremonies.·         Education
The portal will feature DVA’s existing catalogue of curriculum-linked, award winning education resources.
New programmes have been developed to complement the portal, such as:

The Curriculum Sharing Project, a collaboration with the History Teachers’ Association of Australia (HTAA), to provide teachers with curriculum-linked units on Australia’s wartime history developed by teachers, for teachers;
A range of ePubs – electronic publications built for Apple and Android tablet devices – on Australia’s wartime history with additional content such as interviews with DVA historians, primary source material and quizzes for students; and
An Apple and Android App providing a comprehensive listing of memorials and commemorative websites from around Australia with education investigations for school children.

History:

As well as providing links to DVA’s commemorative websites on experiences of Australians at war, the portal also features:

Interviews with veterans of the Second World War and Korean War, providing students and the community with an insight into wartime experiences and remembrance;
A digital exhibition of memorabilia from around Australia showing how the Great War has been remembered in local communities; and
Research guides and links to the Australian War Memorial, National Archives of Australia and other national institutes for people wanting to research their relatives’ service.

Events:

The Portal will provide links to State and Territory government websites to enhance public awareness of domestic and community commemorations happening throughout Australia during the Anzac Centenary period;

DVA is currently progressing talks with State/Territory governments to enhance this awareness via a postcode/suburb searchable map plotting commemorative events around Australia.

The portal provides links to:

Information on DVA-run international services such as those at Gallipoli and Villers-Bretonneux;
International First World War centenary websites so the public is aware of commemorative events and programmes occurring in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Canada and the United States.

Information to support community-based commemorative services will be featured, such as guides for, and music to support, commemorative services.AE2 update
This project will conclude at the end of this financial year. 
In the lead up to Anzac Day a number of activities will occur including the completion of the check survey (re cathodic protection system and navigation buoy), a closing conference to be held in Istanbul, a plaque unveiling at Kabatepe and a Commemorative service wreath laying over the wreck (RAN led). 
The Australian National Maritime Museum will be the Australian Government entity responsible for the AE2. 
Gallipoli 1915: a century on
The Minister attended an international history conference hosted by theAustralian War Memorial and Australian National University on 18-20 March 2015.  The conference positioned Australia at the forefront of international research on the Gallipoli campaign. 
Commemorations
Anzac Centenary Local Grants Program
The Australian Government’s Anzac Centenary Local Grants Program assists and encourages communities across Australia to undertake their own Anzac Centenary projects that commemorate the service and sacrifice of Australian servicemen and women in the First World War.
The Anzac Centenary Local Grants Program provided funding of up to $125,000 to each Federal Member of Parliament (MP) to support projects in their electorate commemorating the First World War.
The closing date for applications was 30 May 2014.
1,790 applications were received from right across the country.  These applications were submitted by community and ex‑service organisations, schools and other educational institutions, museums and cultural institutions, local government authorities and non-profit community organisations.
Decisions have now been made on all applications, with 1,649 grants totalling $16.7 million (ex GST) across 150 electorates approved. 
This funding will support a range of commemorative, educational and cultural projects honouring Australia’s servicemen and women as part of the Anzac Centenary national programme and provide communities with an opportunity to pay tribute to those involved in the First World War, and to commemorate the Anzac Centenary locally.Gallipoli Ballot
As at 16 March 2015, less than 250 of the 3,862 double pass offers remain to be accepted for the Gallipoli Ballot.  Those offers that are declined will continued to be re-issued to the next person on the wait list in the same category they were originally offered.  The wait list will operate until 31 March 2015.
Individuals who declined their offer have done so for a range of reasons, including an increased awareness of the physical challenges of attending the services, the cost of the trip and changes to their personal circumstances.
A further 60 double passes were released to Australians on the wait list thanks to the generosity of the Turkish Government which handed back 150 of the 250 places originally reserved for official guests, providing an additional 60 double passes for Australians and 15 double passes for New Zealanders.
An additional two double passes were released to Australians on the wait list following the return of four single student passes from the Tasmanian government.
The total number of double attendance passes available to Australians is now 3,862.Western Front
In February 2014, the Minister announced that in addition to the annual Anzac Day Dawn service at the Australian National Memorial, Villers-Bretonneux and the Australian Service at the Digger Memorial just outside of Bullecourt, the Australian government will deliver a number of services commemorating key battles and campaigns on the Western front. These are:
2016 – France

19 July – Battle of Fromelles; and;
23 July – Battle of Pozieres.

2017 - Belgium

26 September – Third Battle of Ypres - Battle of Polygon Wood, Buttes New British Cemetery.

2018 - France

4 July – Le Hamel
11 November – 100th Anniversary of the Armistice

There is a lot of interest from Australian descendants wishing to attend Centenary services. Also a great deal of interest from locals, so we are currently liaising with the Mayors and planning committees of the local towns.
Planning is well underway for these commemorations and how best to manage attendance at all Centenary services on the Western Front.Commonwealth projects
It is also worth noting the contributions to the Anzac Centenary National Programme by other Commonwealth agencies over the Anzac Centenary period. For example:

The National Archives of Australia’s website Discovering Anzacs is now live and is progressing well with a substantial amount of image content uploaded by the public.
The Australian National Maritime Museum’s exhibition War at Seacontinues on display at Darling Harbour in Sydney until May 2015 before it starts touring.
The Department of Education’s Simpson Prize has been approved for funding for 2016, 2017 and 2018.Anzac Centenary Public Fund
Over $17 million has now been donated to the Anzac Centenary Public Fund.
In total, some $48 million has been committed by corporate Australia and will be paid over the period of the Centenary.  Corporate donors include Woodside, Commonwealth Bank of Australia, ANZ Bank and Aurizon.
Donations collected in the Public Fund will be provided to State and Territory Anzac Centenary projects as a priority.
In total, the States and Territories have requested approximately $72 million from the Public Fund for their iconic projects.
The Public Fund Board met four times in 2014 to assess projects for funding and to make recommendations to Government.  These recommendations were accepted.
In total, the Minister has announced $11.67 million to date for the following projects:

o   almost $1.7 million to the Northern Territory, as requested, to fund the Borella Ride;
o   $0.35 million for the Queensland Remembers Gallery and Exhibition, which represents that state’s funding request for 2014-15;
o   $0.3 million for Tasmania’s Flame of Remembrance at Hobart’s Cenotaph, which represents the full funding request for the project;
o   $1.1 million for Tasmania’s Hobart Soldiers’ Memorial Avenue, which represents the full funding request for the project;
o   $3 million for Victoria’s Shrine of Remembrance, which represents a part reimbursement of the Commonwealth’s agreed share of up to $22.5 million;
o   $3 million for NSW’s Hyde Park Memorial, which represents a part payment of the Commonwealth’s agreed share of up to $19.6 million;
o   $2m towards Adelaide’s Memorial Garden Walk, which represents a part payment of the Commonwealth’s agreed share of up to $5 million; and
o   $0.22 million for a single three-year Sir John Monash Anzac Centenary Scholarship.
 
Arts and Culture
Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund
The Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund Public Grants Program is a grassroots program to support local communities, organisations and artists to create their own arts and culture projects to commemorate the Anzac Centenary.
Many of the projects supported through this round of the Program focus on commemoration of the Gallipoli campaign and other significant battles of the First World War. 
The Arts and Culture Fund is split into two affiliated streams – the Production and Commissioning Fund and the Public Grants Program.  Eight projects have been selected to be funded by the Production and Commissioning Fund.  These are: 
1 - Art Gallery of South Australia: En-trenched: contemporary artists and the art of the trenches, $75,000.
2 - Big hART Inc: Samurai Digger, $50,000.
3 - Brisbane Powerhouse Foundation: Ten Percent Terror, $25,000.
4 - Perth International Arts Festival: The Giants by Royal de Luxe, $150,000.
5 - Queensland Theatre Company: Black Diggers 2015 national tour, $200,000.
6 - The Production Company (Australia) Limited: The Silver Donkey, $100,000.
7 - Victorian Arts Centre Trust: Theatres of War: Wartime Entertainment and the Australian Experience, $60,000,
8 - Victoria Opera Company Ltd: Remembrance, $45,000.
A second round of grants under the Public Grants Program is expected to open for applications after Anzac Day 2015. This round will commemorate the First World War Armistice and Australia’s service and sacrifice in other conflicts during the past hundred years, with activities and projects to be delivered out to 2018. 
More information about the Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund and a full list of recipients under the Anzac Centenary Arts and Culture Fund Public Grants Program can be found on the Ministry for the Arts website www.arts.gov.au. 

[VVFA Logo 2]

Dear Presidents, Committee Members, Members and Friends,
Unprecedented attack on disabled veterans’ pensions continues
The New Year brings a continuation of the government’s unprecedented attack on the pensions and benefits of disabled veterans and war widows.
It wants the Senate to agree to the following measures.
·         The downgrading of the indexation of the Service, TPI, other veterans’ disability and War Widows pensions as well as the Income Support Supplement and the equivalent MRCA payments.
This may not be noticed at first because the initial reduction will be small, but over time it compounds and progressively makes a greater and greater difference. Mark Riley on 7 News reported on 11 April 2014 that by 2020 the Service Pension would be round $100 a fortnight less than had no downgrading of indexation taken place. The Combined Pensioners and Superannuants Association (CPSA) estimate is much higher than that.
·         Ceasing for three years any indexation catch ups of income means test free areas.
This will hit Part Service Pensioners such as those whose also receiving a Military Superannuation Pension (eg DFRDB/DFRB/MSBS).
Part Service Pensioners are allowed a small means test free amount before their Service Pension begins to lose 50cents for every dollar of their income. That means test free amount is indexed so that it catches up with increases in the cost of living (inflation).
The government intends to cease this indexation so that, in real terms, Part Service Pensioners’ pensions will be reduced.
·         Part Service Pensioners will also be hit by the government’s intention to cease indexation of the maximum amount of income allowable before the pensioner becomes ineligible for any amount of Service Pension.
It means that Part Service Pensioners are to be squeezed at both ends.
·         Part Service Pensioners will be hit yet again by the government’s intention to reduce deeming thresholds then cease their indexation for three years.
This will effectively reduce the real value of pensions.
The government wants these changes to take effect in 2017, which is soon after the next Federal election.
The combination of these changes would, as the years pass, drag disabled veteran and war widow pensioners further and further behind community income standards.
And that’s not all.
·         Gold Card holders presently receiving the much needed $886 Seniors’ Supplement will be stripped of it.
         The three months' backdating of disability pensions will be scrapped. This is a mean one because the  backdating  recognises the unique nature of military service and the medical expenses that accumulate prior to a claim being lodged. Should the government get its way, it would be a considerable loss to disabled veterans.These unprecedented attacks on veterans’ and war widows’ benefits are spread amongst three bills the government will bring before the Senate for a vote early this year. Their spread between three bills is presumably a ploy to hide their combined effect, to sneak them through in diluted form.
Those three bills are:
·         Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (2014 Budget Measures No. 5) Bill 2014.
·         Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Seniors Supplement Cessation) Bill 2014.
         Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (2014 Budget Measures No. 4) Bill 2014. 
The question is: ‘Why is the government attacking disabled veterans and war widows?’
Haven’t they already sacrificed enough?
 
We know Labor Senators and Senator Jacqui Lambie will vote against the bills and we understand the Australian Greens Senators will also vote against them.. But this will not be enough to defeat them. The votes of Senators from the minor parties and of Independent Senators will decide.
Here is a list of the Senators whose votes will be critical. If you would like to help having the nasty bills voted down, you could send this e-mail or one of your own to any or all of these Senators.
Senator Glenn Lazaras, Palmer United Party, senator.lazarus@aph.gov.auus
Senator Zhenya Wang, Palmer United Party, senator.wang@aph.gov.au
Senator Nick Xenophon, Independent, senator.xenophon@aph.gov.au
Senator Ricky Muir, Australian Motoring Enthusiasts Party, senator.muir@aph.gov.au
Senator Bob Day AO, Family First Party, senator.day@aph.gov.au
Senator John Leyohjelm, Liberal Democratic Party, senator.leyohjelm@aph.gov.au
Senator John Madigan, Independent, senator.madigan@aph.gov.au
Senator Whish-Wilson, Australian Greens, senator.whish-wilson@aph.gov.au
 
Tim McCombe
National President
(We would be grateful if you would distribute widely)

DRAFT DOCUMENT

The Correct Wearing of Service Medals, Accoutrements, Returned from Active Service Badge (RASB), Civilian Badges
and Name Plates ( Draft Document 1)

To help sort out the confusion that seems to reign within many associations when it comes to the wearing of Service Medals, Military Accoutrements, Return from Active Service Badge and Civilian Badges with civilian attire.

While our association can’t force our members to abide with traditional protocols that apply to the wearing of Service Medals, Military Accoutrements (RASB) and Civilian Badges when in civilian attire, one would hope enough pride still exists in wearing what we were officially awarded without shopping for additional bling (bogus gongs).

 

The Correct Wearing of Medals, Miniatures and Military Accoutrements (Citations, ICB etc)

Medals, miniatures and military accoutrements are worn on the left breast with the top of the riband midway between the shoulder and breast pocket.  Females are to wear their medals in similar fashion depending on style of dress worn.  Official medals worn by the NOK of a deceased serviceman or woman are worn on the right breast.  All unofficial or bogus medals such as the frontline service medal and others not issued by the Australian Government should not be worn and discouraged.

Full Size Medals

Full sized medals are worn during daylight events on occasions shown below:

At ANZAC Services and Marches

On Remembrance Day Services

At Unit and/or Association Commemorative events e.g  Vietnam Veterans Day, Long Hai Day

At the funeral of a serviceman or ex-serviceman when requested by the deceased’s family

As an invited guest at a military parade where the troops on parade are wearing ceremonial dress and wearing medals unless requested otherwise.Miniature Medals

Miniature Medals

Are to be worn to dinners or events such as Regimental Dining In Night or other formal association dinners that occur after 6 pm and when evening dress, dinner jacket or lounge suit or equivalent female attire is ordered or requested.

Name plates, RASB, RSL or other unit or association badges

No name plates, RASB, RSL or other unit badges are to be worn with medals at the above mentioned occasions.

Military Accoutrements other than the ICB are not to be worn on civilian attire other than on the above mentioned occasions.
 
The RASB was created after WW1 to help identify the wearer as an individual who has returned from active service at his work place and within the civilian community.  It is usually worn on civilian attire such as suits, coats and jackets along with RSL and other badges.   It is not to be worn with service medals.

Name plates are usually worn at informal association gatherings to help our members in identifying each other after long absences.  Name plates are not to be worn with medals at any time.

Let us reclaim our pride and wear what we are entitled to and not like a tin pot wanabe,belonging to some third world country republic.

DRAFT Document 1.

Our Association in conjunction with other Association including RARA INC are to work on a paper on this